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Learn More

About the campaign

The First Stop Farm Shop campaign, funded by the Community Food Fund, is encouraging Scottish consumers and their families to make their local farm shop their first port of call when going grocery shopping.

While we’re not asking people to stop visiting the supermarket, we believe the wealth of produce available at Scottish farm shops is second to none.

Shopping in your local farm shops means that, as well as supporting your local farmers, you’ll be able to explore the huge variety of homegrown food and drink available on your doorstep.

The First Stop Farm Shop campaign joins the huge amount of activity already taking place in 2015 across Scotland as part of the Year of Food and Drink celebrations. Our campaign focuses on four main themes: Provenance, Rural Economy, Health and Wellbeing and Education.

Provenance

Provenance

  • From field to plate, the freshest produce around
  • Nature at its best, Scotland’s natural larder
  • Keeping it in the family, doing what we do best

“At Castleton Farm Shop we’re passionate about using our own fruit and sourcing produce from local farmers and suppliers. We highlight the Provenance to our visitors on our shelves and throughout the menus in our café. This helps our customers make informed buying choices.”


Anna Mitchell
Castleton Farm Shop
Provenance
Rural Economy

Rural Economy

  • Supporting the Scottish farming industry
  • Keeping money in your local community
  • Preserving a traditional way of life in your area

"Farming has never proved to be a get rich quick venture, more a lifestyle that is all encompassing and extremely hard work. Economies of scale and diversification are often the only way to keep your head above water, and collectively the latter is being adopted with increasing success in Scotland. There are so many intricate facets that comprise the Rural Economy but when farming and food collaborate with the increasingly inquisitive tourism sector, real growth can be realised. Country men and women have historically always had to use their hands to maintain their existence; now more than ever before, there is a growing group of food pioneers that are rearing, growing and creating amazing foods in some of the most remote locations. The commercial world is becoming a smaller place by the day and there’s a real buzz around what can be possible if you have the right ideas and wherewithal.”


Will Docker
Balgove Larder
Rural Economy
Health & Wellbeing

Health & Wellbeing

  • Healthy families are happy families
  • Food is fundamental to the wellbeing of our local communities
  • Good, honesty food. A visit to your local farm shop is an active day our for all the family

“Our relationship to the food we eat is a fundamental. As local food producers, we have an important part to play in telling our story to local communities, allowing customers to make better health-conscious decisions for themselves and their families.

“We believe the food choices people make in their local farm shop are proven to be healthier than a supermarket.

"It’s not hard to have health in mind when we are continually surrounded by hand reared beef (My father’s hands I might add!) and delicious locally-grown vegetables on a daily basis.

“You also don’t have to jump in the car to get to your local farm shop. Many of our customers cycle and walk to The Store, it’s quite amazing how many roasting joints you can fit in a rucksack!"


Andrew Booth
The Store
Health & Wellbeing
Education

Education

  • Inspiring and nurturing the next generation of Scottish farmers
  • Telling our story through fun and educational activities and visits
  • A shared commitment to educational work associated with food, farming and the countryside

"From a farm shop perspective, the public are on our doorstep and we engage with our local community on a daily basis. We welcome over 40 school visits every year and we love it. Being a good farming neighbour means talking to the local community and educating our young people about what local produce is available to them and their families. The biggest problem facing the farming community is the lost connection between the farmer and the customer. It’s our responsibility to keep farming alive and to nurture the next generation."


John Sinclair
Craigies Farm Deli and Café
Education